Posts Tagged ‘Oroquin-10’

EPM Drugs Discussed at AAEP

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

EPM was certainly discussed at AAEP.  In one class with Dr. Reed and Dr. MacKay, Dr. MacKay said he would wait for FDA approval to use the Oroquin-10.  Dr. MacKay also promotes the use of Marquis at 7X the dose for loading, or at higher doses, longer duration, or mixed with sulpha/pyrimeth.

Marquis is only approved by FDA at 1X for 28 days.  Dr. MacKay is using and publishing protocols that are not FDA approved. Why?  Because Marquis at 1X doesn’t work very well.  The FOI will tell you that 5X doesn’t work any better.  At 10X the FDA approved dose Marquis does have a marginally better success rate.  The  published CNS values of Marquis are not high enough to kill at 1X.

Dr. Andrews is using a protocol with Sulpha/pyrimeth at a 2X dose.  This was shown in the Rebalance trials (FOI) to be toxic.  It is not FDA approved.  Why is he using this?  Because sulpha/pyrimeth at 1X for 270 days doesn’t work very well, and causes anemia.  A 2X dose makes the anemia worse.

Protazil, using the blinded observers, was only 42% effective at 1X dose (it’s on the insert).  MacKay suggests diclazuril be used at 7X the FDA dose, or for longer periods, or mixed with sulpha/pyrimeth.  Only 1X for 28 days is FDA approved.

Dr. Reed suggested to me by consultation, that I use a higher dose of Marquis on Charlie.  This is not an FDA approved protocol.  He certainly did not let me know that.

Dr. Johnson said  on the latest Intervet-sponsored EPM Webinar, they would only talk about FDA-approved drugs.  Less than a minute later, Dr. Andrews is answering web questions about higher, longer drug protocols that are not FDA approved. (Intervet makes Protazil)

None of these used/published protocols are FDA approved.  The veterinarians are not collecting information in a trial.  They do not collect titers after the treatment to see if the horse’s immune system is winding down.  They are simply throwing drugs at the problem, and hoping it will go away.  Does this sound scientific to you?  It shouldn’t.   If your vet has prescribed one of these
protocols to you, they are running a non-FDA-approved mini field trial, with no back-up of proof that it works.  Why?  Because the existing FDA-approved drugs don’t work well.

At least the Oroquin-10 drug trial indicates ‘TRIAL’, is measuring titers before and after the treatment, provides support to vets, and is working its way through the FDA process.  Oroquin-10 is based on a study of decoquinate by Dr. David Lindsay.  This study shows a very high kill rate.   Adding levamisole to the mix seems to help.

If MacKay, Andrews, Johnson and Reed want to use only FDA approved drugs, why are they promoting, using, and publishing non-FDA protocols?  Seems like the pot is calling the kettle black.

As Good as it Gets

Monday, October 17th, 2011

In September I posted that I had seen great improvement with Fudge’s cranial symptoms with the preventative dose of decoquinate.  I discussed giving Fudge a treatment of decoquinate to see if it would help with any latent infection.  And the answer is… I have not seen additional improvement with the treatment dose.  I think he is as good as he is going to get.

I know from testing the other horse that my two are getting multiple exposures to Sarcocystis neurona over the course of a year.  There are a lot of opossums in my area, and I see them weekly.  This re-exposure will help keep the IgG antibodies primed in their bodies.  In this case, did a treatment dose of decoquinate help?  I don’t think so, the preventative had already helped his immune system tackle any latent infection.  Did the treatment dose hurt?  I’m not seeing any downside to one treatment dose.  It would not be a good idea to treat repeatedly, thinking he would get better.

Play It Again Sam…

Tuesday, September 6th, 2011

I just got done watching the Webinar “A Novel Strategy for Treatment of and Protection Against EPM.”  It looks like the research on EPM has come a long ways…and has a long ways to go.  Fudge is hoping for the vaccine(s).  The quantity of treatment successes are far better than with the drugs that Fudge took.  I did like the picture on the last slide of the person dancing on the bar.

The webinar was recorded, and is available here:  “A Novel Strategy for Treatment of and Protection against EPM”

Just one question…Who came up with the name “Pathogenes Inc. Multiplex Sarcocystis neurona Antibody Detection Pack?”

EPM Webinar Link

Sunday, August 21st, 2011

The webinar will be live from Ocala, FL, with veterinarians in the audience.  I’m sure there will be a lively exchange between some of the top veterinarians studying EPM.  It is aimed at veterinarians, but anyone may sign up.  I highly recommend this for horse owners that want to expand their knowledge of horse health.  The webinar is free, and you will be able to sign up through September 2nd.  Click the link below to sign-up.

“A Novel Strategy for Treatment and Protection Against EPM”

 

Diving into Prevention

Wednesday, August 17th, 2011

Posts on the Yahoo group have indicated that owners trying the treatment Oroquin-10 on horses that previously had been ‘fully’ treated with other drugs was giving a measure of improvement in skin sensitivity or behavoir.  There is some evidence from the field trial that giving the preventative may help as well.  I’m going to take the dive, and give Fudge the preventative, and see if we get any improvements.  What I am aiming for, is improvement in the lips or tongue.  Fudge still drops a lot of the beet pulp concentrate each night.  He only gets a pound, but 1/3 of it ends up on the floor.  We’ll keep you posted.

Drug Trial Blog For those that are REALLY INTO this disease. ;-)