Posts Tagged ‘statistics’

The Unwanted Horse

Friday, June 12th, 2009

No, I’m not talking about Fudge.

I am talking about the tens of thousands of horses in the United States that are classified as unwanted.  This week I attended a lecture on the topic.  It was hosted by a PA State Senator, an officer of the Pennsylvania Equine Council, and the head of a local horse rescue.

Library of Congress, St. Petersburg, FL  1947

Library of Congress, St. Petersburg, FL 1947

The panel discussion gave the opportunity to voice differing opinions on the growing problem.  I listened to the sheer number of horses, the fiscal repercussions, and realities on both sides of the slaughter debate.  One thing became clear.  Many more horse owners must become involved in this debate, regardless of how they view slaughter.  The problem is too big for you to not be affected emotionally, fiscally, and responsibly. 

Being the owner of a fully retired, blind horse; a Mustang; a sick unride-able horse, and having fostered OTTB’s, perhaps you could say that I’m just a sucker for the unwanted horse.  Please visit these two web sites to learn more:

http://www.unwantedhorsecoalition.org/?id=1

http://www.canterusa.org/midatlantic/index.htm

Tell them that Fudge sent you.

By The Numbers

Monday, March 2nd, 2009

55% Horses in the NE that have been exposed to the EPM protozoa

1-2% Of horses exposed to EPM will get an active infection

60% Horses that respond to drug therapy

10% Uncertain percentage of horses that fully recover

20% Horses that relapse within three years of treatment

Because there is no mandatory reporting for this disease, the figures are an educated guess by researchers.  I have seen statistics that indicate only 5% of the horses will fully recover.  What the statistics don’t say?  The 40% that don’t respond to drug therapy progressively get worse until they die or are euthanized.

The statistics are a compilation of percentages that have appeared in various TheHorse.com articles, Equus Magazine, and ‘EPM: Managing Relapses’, Compendium Equine, Jan/FEb 2008.